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Should we feel sorry for the Greeks?

May 27, 2010

The Greek House Blog

It’s a few weeks since I wrote about our wonderful sailing holiday in the Ionian.  Since then the poor old Greeks have been having a tough time and the younger generation are going to suffer, thanks to the antics of their seniors.

Elafonissis Beach Crete

When I lived in Crete in the 80’s we were paid around £50 a week and, try as we might, my colleagues and I hardly ever managed to spend this as our Greek friends were so generous and giving.  Unlike the Brits, it is in the Greek nature to share and share they did – in fact if you have visited Greece you will know how offended these warm and hospitable people can become if you even hint at offering to pay your way.  This is just one of the many reasons why we should all visit their beautiful country.  There is nowhere else on earth like Greece.  Instead of shrugging and adopting the attitude that “they have brought on their troubles themselves,” we should instead admire the way they have held on like grim death to their traditions and not allowed anyone or anything to change the beliefs which have made Greece such a fascinating and wonderful country.  A pity we didn’t follow their lead or our public services wouldn’t now be bursting at the seams, nor would we be facing some of the tax hikes which are sure to be coming our way any minute now.

However, I suppose we shouldn’t feel too sorry for them – at least the Greeks will always have one of their stunning 1400 islands to choose from when wanting to escape the heat of the Athenian summer!  Here are some you may not have heard of :

Gavdos Island

Gavdos Island near Crete

Gavdos island lies 22 miles off the south west coast of Crete, in the Libyan Sea and is the most southerly point in Europe. The island is inhabited by only around 40 people!  You can take the boat from Sfakia on the mainland, but be aware that apart from beautiful beaches with occasional tavernas and scented pine forests, there is evidence of  little else.

Spinalonga

Spinalonga Island Crete

In 1903 after Crete had become independent, all Turks were obliged to leave the island.  However, some of them living on the small island of Spinalonga just off the north-east coast of Crete declined to leave, as they were protected by the French navy, which had a base on Spinalonga.

The government therefore decided to scare them off by banishing all inhabitants who were sick with leprosy from the island of Crete to Spinalonga.  The lepers were known as “the untouchables,” because at that time their illness was incurable and contagious.  (Leprosy was thought to be a punishment from God).  Fearing contamination, the Turks fled from Spinalonga back to Turkey.  Spinalonga became a leper colony which existed until a cure was found  in 1950.  The colony closed down in 1957.  Since 1970 the island has been visited by tourists who take boats from nearby Plaka, Elounda and Agios Nikolaos.  A good read is The Island by Victoria Hislop.

Chrissi Island

Clear Sea at Chrissi IslandAlso known as Gaidouronisi, ‘Donkey Island’, lies 8 miles  to the south east of Crete.  This uninhabited island is 5km long, and only about 1 km wide.  It’s known for its sandy beaches and unspoilt beauty.  It takes around 50 minutes by boat from Ierapetra on the south coast of Crete. There is no accommodation – just one taverna, at Vougiou Mati where the boat comes in.

Balos-Gramvoussa

Balos to Gramvoussa Island

Tigani to Balos is the tip of the westernmost peninsula of Crete, is a paradise of turquoise lagoons and pure white sandy beaches.
It is accessible by boat or Jeep but be  aware the road leading to the beach is what you might describe as rough going!

See The Greek House website for more on Greece and the islands

Read more from the Greek House Blog

sailing-in-the-ionian/

greece-her-captivating-islands/

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  2. […] dodecanese-islands/ time-to-think-about-remote-greek-islands/ should-we-feel-sorry-for-the-greeks/ sailing-in-the-ionian/ greece-her-captivating-islands/ Possibly related posts: (automatically […]



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