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Dodecanese Islands

June 10, 2010

Karpathos Island Dodecanese Greece

Some Greek property owners still have availability on their lovely island properties so if you’ve been waiting for things in Greece to calm down and haven’t booked yet, you might find it useful to read about some of the lesser known islands – I’m dedicating this week’s blog to the Dodecanese group of islands.

Whilst looking for our magical Greek get-away, I found some simply gorgeous villas for sale in Astypalea, the butterfly-shaped island which is 18km long by 13km wide.  This is a good one to start with if you like mythology as Astypalaia was named after a woman abducted by Poseidon in the form of a winged fish-tailed leopard (work that one out)!  The Astypalea coastline is  rocky with many small pebbly beaches and the most popular beach is Maltezana, from where you can take a boat to Moura and Parou. Ferries connect the island with Piraeus, Naxos, Paros, Kalymnos and other islands of the Dodecanese.

Astypalea Villas

The Dodecanese islands are made up of 12 large Rhodes Kos Patmos Astypalea, Kalymnos, Karpathos, Kasos, Leros, Nisyros, Symi, Tilos and Kastelorizo plus 150 smaller islands.

Rhodes

Rhodes is famous for the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the World.  The Colossus of Rhodes was a statue of Helios, god of the sun which straddled the entrance to Rhodos Harbour between 292 and 280 BC. Before it was destroyed by an earthquake in 224BC, the statue stood over 100 feet high, which made it the tallest statue of ancient times.

PatmosGreek Cheese Pie
Famous for its religious past, the island is where Saint John wrote the Book of Revelation. Patmos is also reknowned for its cheese products (touloumotyri and mizithra) –  the delicious tyropita (cheesepie) is one of the island’s specialties!


Kalymnos

Kalymnos GreeceWell known for it’s sponges Sponge Diving has been the livelihood of Kalymnos for many years and it is this rare skill which differentiates Kalymnos from the rest of the world. http://www.seasponges.com.au/information/sponge-diving/

Karpathos
Windsurfer_KarpathosIf you’re into windsurfing this could be the island for you.  During May and October the Meltemi (Aegean wind) blows between force 5-7 all day long
http://www.windsurfing-karpathos.com/

Kasos

Greek Singer Mario FrangoulisThe world famous tenor Mario Frangoulis comes from Kasos – he gives a concert in August in the picturesque harbour of Mpoukas. The event attracts an audience from all over Greece.

Leros

Greek Church Leros IslandI fell in love with Leros in the 80s when I was travelling on my own for a familiarisation trip with Olympic Holidays – a quiet haven which has since become one of the more sought after upmarket destinations among the Greek islands.


Nysiros

Greek town on NysirosLike Santorini,  Nisyros is a volcanic islandwhich offers wonderful landscapes and walks, beautiful beaches and a clear sea, old churches and monasteries with a rich history and lovely Greek villages with nice restaurants and bars.

Symi Symi is an island with great religious tradition. It is not known for it’s sandy beaches but  is well known for it’s  monastery, built on the bay of Panormos and is dedicated to the Archangel Michael, protector of the island.

Tilos
According to mythology this small, but very beautiful island gets its name from the young son of Alia and Helios. Tilos, who loved his mother dearly, visited the island in search of herbs to make her well. Later on, he returned to Tilos to build a temple in honor of Apollo and Poseidon.
Beach pic

Kastelorizo
Cave Greek Island KastellorizoThe Aqua-coloured Cave of Kastellorizo is one of the rarest geological phenomena on Earth and makes Kastellorizo well worth a visit. The cave is also known as “Fokiali” seals ( fokia ) which live inside – and it is the most phantasmagorical cave in the whole of the Med . It is 75m long (inside), 40m wide and 35m high.

Read more from The Greek House blog:

should-we-feel-sorry-for-the-greeks/

greece-her-captivating-islands/

sailing-in-the-ionian/

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One comment

  1. […] dodecanese-islands/ time-to-think-about-remote-greek-islands/ should-we-feel-sorry-for-the-greeks/ […]



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