Posts Tagged ‘Greece’

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Navplion – A City To Visit In Summer Or Winter

November 11, 2013

Fortress-Navplion-GreeceNavplion – A City To Visit in Summer Or Winter

My first glimpse of Navplion was from our chartered yacht as we rounded the headland during a glorious evening sail in July 2012.  As we approached we could see the magnificent fort on our port side, which the Greeks once used to guard the entrance to the harbour.

Our berth (one of the last available against the harbour wall) was to be between our lead boat and a vast high-sided catamaran with a rather anxious gentleman on board who began pacing up and down even more quickly when he saw a female at the helm.  Once safely ensconced for the night, we couldn’t wait to explore this city which had seen so much history.

Navplion History

Bouboulina

Greek Naval Admiral

Navplion was the capital of Greece before Athens (1821-1834) and sits at the head of the Argolic Gulf in the Peloponnese.  It is here where the fearless sea captain Laskarina Bouboulina and her fleet of eight ships sailed to and took part in the siege of the fortress which she eventually captured.  Bouboulina was born on the island of Hydra, moved to Spetses following her marriages to two sea captains who left her wealthy enough after their deaths to buy several ships and form her own fleet.  Very sadly, Bouboulina was shot on 22nd May 1825,  in a family dispute. Bouboulina was one of the first women to play a major revolutionary role and without her and her ships, the Greeks may well not have gained their independence.

Within walking distance of the (industrial) harbour wall is the most amazing ice-cream shop … further on a plethora of side streets lead you away from the main road to the pedestrianized area and grand main square which is adorned with the most attractive Venetian-style houses, restaurants, bars, shops and tavernas.  There is so much to do in Navplion, you would be hard-pressed to get round it all in a day, well, that is if you take in refreshments, food and shopping like we did!

During the hot summer months, pretty much all the restaurants feature those welcoming ice-fans to cool you down while you sip your vodka-martini and watch the action – always lots going on in the way of outdoor entertainment.

Easily accessible from Navplion is Mycenae

Mycenae

Entrance to the underground water source at Mycenae

What a spectacular coastal view from the home which used to belong to the King of Sparta, Agamemnon.  There is an almost eerie silence which surrounds the ruins now and the highlight for me were to treat the well-worn steps from ground level, leading underground to an extensive plumbing system which provided Mycenae with fresh drinking water.

History: The site of Mycenae was first excavated in 1874 by Heinrich Schliemann, the German amateur archaeologist who had also discovered the ruins of Troy.  A magnificent palace used to reside on this hillside, which was surrounded by great walls.  The city was crowned with an acropolis even before the Mycenaean civilization, and the location of the site was of huge strategic importance.  The ancient city boasted houses, bakeries, workshops, and even a granary. Several of the tombs in Mycenae have been named after the family of Atreus. There is Agamemnon’s tomb, the tomb of Clytemnestra and Aegisthus’ tomb.
Mycenae was almost completely destroyed by a fire in the 12th century. The Mycenaean civilization declined, but the area was still inhabited. It is believed it was abandoned in the 3rd century AD.

The findings from Mycenae can be viewed in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens, but all over Greece there are also smaller museums that hold Mycenaean objects.

Summary:

Navplion is a joy to visit.  From a sailor’s perspective, no showers immediately available on the quayside but lots of small hotels if you are desperate in the winter.  You can eat with the locals at a typical taverna offering local dishes in one of the back streets or dine out in your finery at one of the high class (and more expensive) restaurants that Navplion has to offer.  The buildings are amazing with a strong Italian influence and there is lots going on.

Return soon to read more about Greece, her islands and all she has to offer.

 

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Should we feel sorry for the Greeks?

May 27, 2010

The Greek House Blog

It’s a few weeks since I wrote about our wonderful sailing holiday in the Ionian.  Since then the poor old Greeks have been having a tough time and the younger generation are going to suffer, thanks to the antics of their seniors.

Elafonissis Beach Crete

When I lived in Crete in the 80’s we were paid around £50 a week and, try as we might, my colleagues and I hardly ever managed to spend this as our Greek friends were so generous and giving.  Unlike the Brits, it is in the Greek nature to share and share they did – in fact if you have visited Greece you will know how offended these warm and hospitable people can become if you even hint at offering to pay your way.  This is just one of the many reasons why we should all visit their beautiful country.  There is nowhere else on earth like Greece.  Instead of shrugging and adopting the attitude that “they have brought on their troubles themselves,” we should instead admire the way they have held on like grim death to their traditions and not allowed anyone or anything to change the beliefs which have made Greece such a fascinating and wonderful country.  A pity we didn’t follow their lead or our public services wouldn’t now be bursting at the seams, nor would we be facing some of the tax hikes which are sure to be coming our way any minute now.

However, I suppose we shouldn’t feel too sorry for them – at least the Greeks will always have one of their stunning 1400 islands to choose from when wanting to escape the heat of the Athenian summer!  Here are some you may not have heard of :

Gavdos Island

Gavdos Island near Crete

Gavdos island lies 22 miles off the south west coast of Crete, in the Libyan Sea and is the most southerly point in Europe. The island is inhabited by only around 40 people!  You can take the boat from Sfakia on the mainland, but be aware that apart from beautiful beaches with occasional tavernas and scented pine forests, there is evidence of  little else.

Spinalonga

Spinalonga Island Crete

In 1903 after Crete had become independent, all Turks were obliged to leave the island.  However, some of them living on the small island of Spinalonga just off the north-east coast of Crete declined to leave, as they were protected by the French navy, which had a base on Spinalonga.

The government therefore decided to scare them off by banishing all inhabitants who were sick with leprosy from the island of Crete to Spinalonga.  The lepers were known as “the untouchables,” because at that time their illness was incurable and contagious.  (Leprosy was thought to be a punishment from God).  Fearing contamination, the Turks fled from Spinalonga back to Turkey.  Spinalonga became a leper colony which existed until a cure was found  in 1950.  The colony closed down in 1957.  Since 1970 the island has been visited by tourists who take boats from nearby Plaka, Elounda and Agios Nikolaos.  A good read is The Island by Victoria Hislop.

Chrissi Island

Clear Sea at Chrissi IslandAlso known as Gaidouronisi, ‘Donkey Island’, lies 8 miles  to the south east of Crete.  This uninhabited island is 5km long, and only about 1 km wide.  It’s known for its sandy beaches and unspoilt beauty.  It takes around 50 minutes by boat from Ierapetra on the south coast of Crete. There is no accommodation – just one taverna, at Vougiou Mati where the boat comes in.

Balos-Gramvoussa

Balos to Gramvoussa Island

Tigani to Balos is the tip of the westernmost peninsula of Crete, is a paradise of turquoise lagoons and pure white sandy beaches.
It is accessible by boat or Jeep but be  aware the road leading to the beach is what you might describe as rough going!

See The Greek House website for more on Greece and the islands

Read more from the Greek House Blog

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Greece & her captivating islands

March 30, 2010

This is a new blog about Greece and the beautiful Greek islands. A passion for me and many others, Greece has inspired artists, writers, historians, archeologists as well as tourists and the recent economic issues facing Greece as a country seem to be having little or no effect on the property market there.

sunrise_IthakiThis blog is intended to provide useful information for anyone thinking of moving to Greece on a permanent basis or for novice travellers to Greece – they are in for a very special treat for there is nowhere like it.

I have lived and worked in Athens, Corfu, Crete, and Rhodes, have enjoyed holidays in Kos, Kalymnos and Leros, Santorini and Mykonos, have sailed the Ionian islands including Lefkada, Kefanlonia and Ithaka.

Based on my experiences, this blog will feature articles on Greek property, the islands, Greek food and language, tips for holidays and sailing trips so sign up for future news and information and be prepared to become captivated. Don’t miss out on all that Greece has to offer.
For more on Greek Property for sale and to rent, visit http://www.thegreekhouse.co.uk